gailsimone
gailsimone:

I have been asking Kate Beaton to draw a Red Sonja cover for the monthly book since issue one. Since she hasn’t done a lot of covers, she was the ONLY female artist we asked who (reluctantly) turned us down.
I think she has agreed to do one if time permits, and she sent this on Twitter to hold us over and I just love it. Kate, you are awesome!

How is that not a perfect cover right there? It looks like the line art to a classic New Yorker cover. Get a REALLY smart and minimalist watercolor coloring job on it and it’s ready to go!

gailsimone:

I have been asking Kate Beaton to draw a Red Sonja cover for the monthly book since issue one. Since she hasn’t done a lot of covers, she was the ONLY female artist we asked who (reluctantly) turned us down.

I think she has agreed to do one if time permits, and she sent this on Twitter to hold us over and I just love it. Kate, you are awesome!

How is that not a perfect cover right there? It looks like the line art to a classic New Yorker cover. Get a REALLY smart and minimalist watercolor coloring job on it and it’s ready to go!

sixpenceee
sixpenceee:

….Until the mid-60s, the Aboriginals came under the Flora And Fauna Act, which classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aboriginal meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.


This last photo caption in this series is false. It’s an understandable mistake: even some Australians believe it’s partly true though I can’t find any Australians who thought it was legal to murder Aboriginal people back then. And this is not a defense of how Australia used to treat the original inhabitants of the land: as a US citizen it sounds awfully familiar and both nations have a long way to go. I’m hoping sixpenceee and others who reblogged the original post will reblog this.
Here are the facts, via Australia’s SBS World News Radio:
[[MORE]]

…Four key misunderstandings persist about modern Indigenous history and the [1967] referendum, which, indeed, passed with more than 90 per cent approval:
1) whether it gave Indigenous people the right to vote in federal elections
2) whether it gave Indigenous people the right to Australian citizenship
3) whether it gave Indigenous people the right to be included in the census, and
4) whether, up until the referendum, Indigenous people were classed as fauna.
The answer, to each, is no, although Peter Buckskin says he fully understands the confusion — and even beyond the campaign of the time.
"Until that referendum, you weren’t entitled, in a sense, to some benefits that all other Australians had entitlements to, and so changing that gave the opportunity for people to receive benefits, to ensure that they had those entitlements that all Australians were entitled to, and I think that gave the perception that it made us citizens."
A one-time researcher for the former State History Centre in South Australia, Pat Stretton, takes those perceptions even a step further.
"Lots and lots of Aborigines celebrate 1967 as the year they got the vote, and it doesn’t matter if you say, ‘No, no, you had the vote before then,’ they’ll still give you a fish eye* and say, ‘We got the vote in 1967.’ And they’re much more correct than I am, because that’s when they felt they were recognised by society and recognised as proper people with proper rights. So, you can say all you like — ‘Oh, I can show you, you had the right to vote … whenever’ — and, if you didn’t know you did, and if, in every other way, you were treated as if you didn’t count, then why would you think you had the right to vote?"
Professor Buckskin points to Indigenous entitlement to social-security benefits, war pensions, child endowments and children’s pensions as very real outcomes of the referendum…

sixpenceee:

….Until the mid-60s, the Aboriginals came under the Flora And Fauna Act, which classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aboriginal meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.

This last photo caption in this series is false. It’s an understandable mistake: even some Australians believe it’s partly true though I can’t find any Australians who thought it was legal to murder Aboriginal people back then. And this is not a defense of how Australia used to treat the original inhabitants of the land: as a US citizen it sounds awfully familiar and both nations have a long way to go. I’m hoping sixpenceee and others who reblogged the original post will reblog this.

Here are the facts, via Australia’s SBS World News Radio:

Read More

larsbrown
larsbrown:

For a crappy temp job I once had.

The recent Spider-Woman kerfuffle got me thinking about what’s important in comics, and it’s not anatomy. Lars Brown represents the things that make comics great. He’s a history teacher who makes comics for the sheer love of it. Sketchy doodly fun. He makes the extraordinary seem every day and the every day seem magical: that’s what good fantasy literature does.He’s no master of anatomy or perspective or rendering but he tells a story clearly and dramatically. I can’t get enough of his work.I’m proud to call risk takers like him my colleagues.

larsbrown:

For a crappy temp job I once had.

The recent Spider-Woman kerfuffle got me thinking about what’s important in comics, and it’s not anatomy. Lars Brown represents the things that make comics great. He’s a history teacher who makes comics for the sheer love of it. Sketchy doodly fun. He makes the extraordinary seem every day and the every day seem magical: that’s what good fantasy literature does.

He’s no master of anatomy or perspective or rendering but he tells a story clearly and dramatically. I can’t get enough of his work.

I’m proud to call risk takers like him my colleagues.

royalboiler

ancestralvision asked:

What do you think, if you care at all, about people being mad about Manara's cover for Spider-Woman?

royalboiler answered:

I have some thoughts on it sure. 

I’ve typed a lot about Manara in the past. Like Here and Here 

I get why people are upset. My understanding was that the book was marketed toward women — and I’ve seen a lot of people claiming the reason people were upset was “a hypersensitivity to erotic images “. I like what my pal Amy Claire said “ i like the booty and i dont like only ever being seen as a booty” 

So yeah, putting that Manara cover and interior artist and noted porn tracer Greg Land on a book meant to be sold as something for women to identify with seems like a huge fuck up on Marvel’s part. 

also, Manara is soo bad at defending his position: 

Like here— “ For evolutionists, including me, on the other hand, women’s bodies have taken this form over the millennia in order to avoid the ‘extinction of the species, in fact. If women were made exactly as men, with the same shape, I think we would have already been extinct for a long time.”

This reads like him saying that only women who look like Liv Tyler ever get pregnant. 

but yeah, I do still argue that Manara has done work that I find incredibly interesting and personally important. His Bergman series is one of the things that I go to when I want to think of new directions that comics can go.

I would love the discussion to be about his larger body of work.  —There’s a lot of stuff in it that I find more worrying than the Spider-woman cover, There’s a lot of erotocizing of rape. and granted I think anything is fair game in ideas on paper. but there’s misogyny there that I don’t wanna co-sign. 

So yeah, Eminem, Bukowski, Manara— another one to the list of artists whose work I love that I have to qualify that I don’t always agree with. and I’m well aware that’s possible for me to do that because I am not the subject of their weird shit. 

image

Anonymous asked:

For a traditional comic artist, Is a lightbox necessary at a professional level?

No single tool is required. You can get by without paper, or inks, or pencils, or a computer. Use what’s useful for you.

If you need to trace an image, whether it’s your own early rough sketches or a photocopy of a car, a lightbox is useful.

If you work digitally from rough to finished colors obviously you won’t need a lightbox. See Freddie E. Williams II’s The DC Comics Guide To Digitally Drawing Comics.

I have a lightbox but I rarely use it. I almost always draw buildings freehand. I do use SketchUp for cars and trucks because it’s quicker than drawing them freehand, which I can do very nicely but it takes time. The only requirement is that you adapt traced reference so that it looks like the rest of your style.

Good luck!