Some of the free sketches for kids & library staff I did at the Eisenhower Public Library’s Mini Comic Con! It was a fun way to spend a Saturday. You can see more of the pictures on my Facebook page.

image

This one deserves a little extra explanation. The younger library staff likes to rib each other, and somehow these three young gals convinced this young guy to get drawn as a 60s Playboy Bunny, with breasts. I threw the three of them in the background as “admirers”.

brianmichaelbendis

withgreatpowercomesgreatblowjobs asked:

Dear Mr Bendis. I wanted to ask a question regarding the beginning of a career. I'm 17, and want to be become a comic writer myself. My major query is; do I need a University (I'm English) degree to be a comic writer? Did you get a degree, or have you heard of cases of people who have made it without having one? I have two B's in English Language and Literature GCSE, and I know how to make a story. I have spoken to another writer, and he told me it was not necessary. Thanks for your time

brianmichaelbendis answered:

I attended the Cleveland Institute of Art for five years… though I did not complete my training as I had already received a contract to make comics and decided to pursue that instead of finishing my degree.

 nobody in this business cares about your academic achievements, all they care about is your ability to tell a story.

now it is my belief that you need academia to achieve at least a large part of that goal..   there are very few people who are rain man like comic book savants that can teach themselves everything they will need to pursue this business. 

 on top of your academia you need to make storytelling part of your lifestyle. you need to write every day. no matter what. you need to purge all of those bad, semi-amateur pages out of yourself so you can get to the good ones.

 everyone you admire in this world, in whatever walk of life, has done this. they have practiced every day. they don’t feel like a complete person unless they do it every day

An unsolicited bit of advice. If you’re going into the arts, any art, take business classes.

If you sell your own work it’s a business. If you freelance you’re a business dealing with a business. If you’re an employee you’ll be more useful if you know how a business works. You’ll avoid endless pains with a little learning.

My 2003 covers for Captain America issues #17#18 & #19 and my 2002 Captain America #50 cover.

The 2002 cover was one of two covers I did before the 9/11 attacks that weirdly presaged the attacks. I felt quite creeped out to see when the cover came out next year that I’d presented Cap marching off to fight in response to Pearl Harbor and jets and explosions over a skyscraper.

lyrafay
garykingoftheworld:

As long as we’re making up BS…. The Avengers succeeded by copying DC comics.
The main characters are a rich hero who has trouble with people and succeeds by his own genius (Batman/Iron Man)
Who doesn’t get along with…
The primary colored hero who is an idealistic good person who tends to fall for strong women (Superman/Captain America)A powerful warrior from a whole different culture who would gladly give up their life to save humanity, even if they haven’t been around humanity much (Wonder Woman/Thor)…

It’s even bigger BS than you think, garykingoftheworld. Here’s writer Roy Thomas interviewing Fantastic Four and Avengers co-creator Stan “The Man” Lee:

That’s right. Stan Lee stole the idea of a superhero team book from DC Comics. And even stealing it wasn’t his idea, that was Marvel Publisher Martin Goodman who handed it to Stan. Good for Stan, it’s an idea worth using and he did it well. But let’s not pretend Marvel invented the superhero team.

garykingoftheworld:

As long as we’re making up BS…. The Avengers succeeded by copying DC comics.

The main characters are a rich hero who has trouble with people and succeeds by his own genius (Batman/Iron Man)

Who doesn’t get along with…

The primary colored hero who is an idealistic good person who tends to fall for strong women (Superman/Captain America)

A powerful warrior from a whole different culture who would gladly give up their life to save humanity, even if they haven’t been around humanity much (Wonder Woman/Thor)…

It’s even bigger BS than you think, garykingoftheworld. Here’s writer Roy Thomas interviewing Fantastic Four and Avengers co-creator Stan “The Man” Lee:

That’s right. Stan Lee stole the idea of a superhero team book from DC Comics. And even stealing it wasn’t his idea, that was Marvel Publisher Martin Goodman who handed it to Stan. Good for Stan, it’s an idea worth using and he did it well. But let’s not pretend Marvel invented the superhero team.

unwrapping

unwrapping:

Tumblr Dashboard Image Sizes:

  • Photo post: 500 by 750 pixels for dashboard view; 1280 by 1920 pixels for high-res version (except for superwide panoramas).
  • Photoset: 500-pixel width for one image in a photoset row. 245-pixel width for two images in a photoset row. 160-pixel width for three images in a photoset row. Gutters are 10 pixels.
  • Audio Post: 169 by 169 pixels for album art.
  • Link Post: 130 by 130 pixels for the thumbnail image grabbed by Tumblr from web link (if available).
  • Text Post: 125-pixel width for images added to a text post, which expand when clicked. As of July 2014, inline images appear as 500 by 750 pixels for dashboard view.
  • Avatar: 64-by-64-pixel icon next to posts.

On a related subject, if you want to add images to a reblog or text piece without it turning into annoying blank gray boxes, here’s how

The trick, in short, is to create a disposable separate Tumblr post in another browser window. Upload the image to Tumblr, go to <html>, swipe the html code, and paste into the html of your original Tumblr post. Now discard the disposable post and you’ve added an image to your Reblog!

gailsimone
gailsimone:

I have been asking Kate Beaton to draw a Red Sonja cover for the monthly book since issue one. Since she hasn’t done a lot of covers, she was the ONLY female artist we asked who (reluctantly) turned us down.
I think she has agreed to do one if time permits, and she sent this on Twitter to hold us over and I just love it. Kate, you are awesome!

How is that not a perfect cover right there? It looks like the line art to a classic New Yorker cover. Get a REALLY smart and minimalist watercolor coloring job on it and it&#8217;s ready to go!

gailsimone:

I have been asking Kate Beaton to draw a Red Sonja cover for the monthly book since issue one. Since she hasn’t done a lot of covers, she was the ONLY female artist we asked who (reluctantly) turned us down.

I think she has agreed to do one if time permits, and she sent this on Twitter to hold us over and I just love it. Kate, you are awesome!

How is that not a perfect cover right there? It looks like the line art to a classic New Yorker cover. Get a REALLY smart and minimalist watercolor coloring job on it and it’s ready to go!

sixpenceee
sixpenceee:

….Until the mid-60s, the Aboriginals came under the Flora And Fauna Act, which classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aboriginal meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.


This last photo caption in this series is false. It&#8217;s an understandable mistake: even some Australians believe it&#8217;s partly true though I can&#8217;t find any Australians who thought it was legal to murder Aboriginal people back then. And this is not a defense of how Australia used to treat the original inhabitants of the land: as a US citizen it sounds awfully familiar and both nations have a long way to go. I&#8217;m hoping sixpenceee and others who reblogged the original post will reblog this.
Here are the facts, via Australia&#8217;s SBS World News Radio:
[[MORE]]

&#8230;Four key misunderstandings persist about modern Indigenous history and the [1967] referendum, which, indeed, passed with more than 90 per cent approval:
1) whether it gave Indigenous people the right to vote in federal elections
2) whether it gave Indigenous people the right to Australian citizenship
3) whether it gave Indigenous people the right to be included in the census, and
4) whether, up until the referendum, Indigenous people were classed as fauna.
The answer, to each, is no, although Peter Buckskin says he fully understands the confusion &#8212; and even beyond the campaign of the time.
"Until that referendum, you weren&#8217;t entitled, in a sense, to some benefits that all other Australians had entitlements to, and so changing that gave the opportunity for people to receive benefits, to ensure that they had those entitlements that all Australians were entitled to, and I think that gave the perception that it made us citizens."
A one-time researcher for the former State History Centre in South Australia, Pat Stretton, takes those perceptions even a step further.
"Lots and lots of Aborigines celebrate 1967 as the year they got the vote, and it doesn&#8217;t matter if you say, &#8216;No, no, you had the vote before then,&#8217; they&#8217;ll still give you a fish eye* and say, &#8216;We got the vote in 1967.&#8217; And they&#8217;re much more correct than I am, because that&#8217;s when they felt they were recognised by society and recognised as proper people with proper rights. So, you can say all you like &#8212; &#8216;Oh, I can show you, you had the right to vote &#8230; whenever&#8217; &#8212; and, if you didn&#8217;t know you did, and if, in every other way, you were treated as if you didn&#8217;t count, then why would you think you had the right to vote?"
Professor Buckskin points to Indigenous entitlement to social-security benefits, war pensions, child endowments and children&#8217;s pensions as very real outcomes of the referendum&#8230;

sixpenceee:

….Until the mid-60s, the Aboriginals came under the Flora And Fauna Act, which classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aboriginal meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.

This last photo caption in this series is false. It’s an understandable mistake: even some Australians believe it’s partly true though I can’t find any Australians who thought it was legal to murder Aboriginal people back then. And this is not a defense of how Australia used to treat the original inhabitants of the land: as a US citizen it sounds awfully familiar and both nations have a long way to go. I’m hoping sixpenceee and others who reblogged the original post will reblog this.

Here are the facts, via Australia’s SBS World News Radio:

Read More